Diplomacy of P.R.China (1949-2013)

Diplomacy of P.R.China (1949-2013)

(Chinese Diplomacy)

Fall 2013 

 

Instructor: Dr. Shen Yi

Office Hours: Wednesday 1:30~3:00 pm

Office Location: Room 739, Wenkelou (Arts and Social Science Building)

Office Telephone: 021-55665434

E-mail: sheny@fudan.edu.cn

 

Course Description:

This course provides students with a comprehensive introduction to contemporary China‟s diplomacy and its foreign policy, as well as their theoretical, historical background. This course will also investigate the decision-making process of Chinese foreign policy, China‟s bilateral relations with major powers, China‟s multilateral relations with its neighboring countries, developing countries and international organizations. Emphasis will be placed on the period since 1978 when China initiated its reform and opening up era while at the same time, the course will try to touch the latest development of the Diplomacy of China represented by the cyber security issues as much as possible.

 

Format:

The course will be conducted with a mixture of lectures, class presentations and discussions, writing assignment, and final exam. It will have a one-hour and a half general meeting per week.

 

Readings:

Before starting a new topic, the instructor will provide a detailed reading list. They are mainly selected from the following textbooks and occasionally other books or journals. The background textbook is available at FDU bookstore and other copies of the required readings and recommended readings are available in the libraries of SIRPA and Centre for American Studies.

 

Background Textbook:

Yang Fuchang, ed., Contemporary China and its Foreign Policy, Beijing: World

Affairs Press, 2003. 杨福昌主编:《当代中国与中国外交》(英文版),北京:世界知识出版社 2003 年版。

 

Required Readings:

1 David M. Lampton, ed., The making of Chinese Foreign and Security Policy in the Era of Reform, 1978-2000 (Stanford California: Stanford University Press, 2001) 2 Thomas W. Robinson & David L. Shambaugh, ed., Chinese Foreign Policy: Theory and Practice, 2nd edition (Oxford: Clarendon Press,1997)

 

Course Requirements:

 

(1)   Participation

Attendance is mandatory. Students will be expected to have completed each week‟s REQUIRED reading assignments before the general meeting, and it will also be welcomed to read those SELECTED reading either before or after the class.

Participation in class discussions is an essential part of the class.

 

(2)   Article review

Students will be required to submit one short article review regarding China‟s foreign policy in a specific issue area (decision-making, public opinion, security/defense, relations with specific nations, etc.) ,which should produce a critical discussion of the literature, not just summarize the readings. Students should submit the paper to the instructor on Oct. 30th, 2013Suggested paper length is 5 pages (double-space), including notes and bibliography.

 

(3)   Presentation and Discussion

Though this class includes some lectures, each student will be required to make at least one structured oral presentations. There will be 2 week presentation and discussion. Students will be divided into 4 groups, each group will hold one subject and arrange the presentation and discussion by team-work. You should address the main points in the readings but also present an argument focusing on particular issues. In doing so, you may need to conduct some additional research by consulting other literature not listed in the syllabus. 

 

Students are expected to significantly contribute to the class discussions. Discussion enlivens a lecture course and is conducive to learning. Participation in free discussion is encouraged.

 

(4)   Final exam

Final exam is a test in which student will chose two questions to answer among the four, each question will be composed of two or three sub questions.  Students have about 2 hours to answer all these questions.

 

Evaluations:

Grades will be determined as follows:

Class participation                     10%

Mid-term: article review                20%

Presentation and discussion              20%

Final exam                           50%

SCHEDUAL AND READINGS IN DETAIL

(13 Class, Sep. 8th, -Dec. 15th, 2013)

 

Part Ⅰ: Introduction

 

Class 1: Introduction and Overview of the Course (Sep. 9th, 2013) 

 

Class 2: Approaches and Methods (Sep. 16th, 2011)

 

Required Reading

 

Allen S. Whiting, “Forecasting Chinese Foreign Policy: IR Theory vs. the

Fortune Cookie,” in Thomas W. Robinson and David Shambaugh, ed., Chinese Foreign Policy: Theory and Practice, (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1997), Ch.19, pp. 506-523 

 

Wang Jisi, “International Relations Theory and the Study of Chinese Foreign Policy: A Chinese Perspective,” in Thomas W. Robinson and David Shambaugh, eds., Chinese Foreign Policy: Theory and Practice, (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1997), Ch.18, pp. 481-505

 

Qin Yaqin, “Relationality and processual construction: bringing Chinese ideas into international relations theory”, Social Sciences in China, Volume 30, Issue 4, 2009, pp. 5–20.

 

Selected Reading

 

Wang Yiwei, “Between Copying and Constructing: China Is Seeking Its IR Theory”, in Arlene B. Tickner and Ole Wæver, eds, Global Scholarship in International Relations: Worlding Beyond the West, chapter 6, Routledge 2008.

 

Ren Xiao, “The International Relations Theoretical Discourse in China: One World, Different Explanations”, Journal of Chinese Political Science, Volume 15, Number 1 / March, 2010, pp. 99-116.

 

Part Ⅱ: Background and Dimensions of DCMP of Contemporary Chinese

Diplomacy

 

Class 3: Historical Legacies and Basic Principles of China’s Foreign Policy (Sep. 23rd, 2013)

 

Required Reading

 

Shaohua Hu, “Revisiting Chinese Pacifism,” Asian Affairs, Vol. 32, No. 4 (Winter 2006), pp. 256-278

 

William C. Kirby, “Traditions of Centrality, Authority, and Management in Modern China‟s Foreign Relations,” in Thomas W. Robinson and David Shambaugh, ed., Chinese Foreign Policy: Theory and Practice, (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1997), Ch.2, pp. 13-29

 

Steven I. Levine, “Perception and Ideology in Chinese Foreign Policy,” in Thomas W. Robinson and David Shambaugh, ed., Chinese Foreign Policy:

Theory and Practice, (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1997), Ch.3, pp. 30-46

 

Selected Reading

 

Yan Xuetong , “Xun Zi’s Thoughts on International Politics and Their Implications”, The Chinese Journal of International Politics, 2008, 2(1), pp. 135-165.

 

Li Xhaojun, “The Peaceful Orientation of Chinese Civilization: From Tradition to Reality—A Response to Those Who See China as a Menace”, Foreign Affairs Journal, No.60, June 2001.

 

Class 4: Strategies, Political Structures and DCMP of China’s Diplomacy (Sep.

30th, 2013)

 

Required Reading

 

Thomas W. Robinson, “Chinese Foreign Policy from the 1940s to the 1990s,” in Thomas W. Robinson and David Shambaugh, ed., Chinese Foreign Policy:

Theory and Practice, (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1997), Ch.21, pp. 555-60

 

Evan S. Medeiros and M. Taylor Fravel, “China‟s New Diplomacy,” Foreign Affairs, Vol. 82, No.6 (Nov/Dec 2003), pp. 22-35

 

Chen Zhimin, “International Structures and China‟ Foreign Policy Choices”, in David Zweig & Chen Zhimin(eds.), China’s Reforms and International Political Economy( London: Routledge, 2007)

 

Yan Xuetong, “The Rise of China and its Power Status”, The Chinese Journal of International Politics, 2006, 1(1), pp. 5-33.

 

David M. Lampton, “China‟s Foreign and National Security Policy-Making Process: Is It Changing, and Does It Matter?” in David M. Lampton, ed., The Making of Chinese Foreign and Security Policy in the Era of Reform, 1978-2000, (Stanford, California: Stanford University Press, 2001), Ch. 1, pp. 1-36

 

Selected Reading

 

Lu Ning, “The Central Leadership, Supra-ministry Coordinating Bodies, State Council Ministries, and Party Departments,” in David M. Lampton, ed., The Making of Chinese Foreign and Security Policy in the Era of Reform, 1978-2000, (Stanford, California: Stanford University Press, 2001), Ch. 2, pp. 39-60 

 

Yu Keping, “The Developmental Logic of Chinese Culture under Modernization and Globalization”, boundary 2, Summer 2008, Vol. 35, Issue 2, pp. 157-182, 26p.

 

Yu Keping, “Toward an Incremental Democracy and Governance: Chinese Theories and Assessment Criteria”, New Political Science, Volume 24, Issue 2, 2002, pp. 181–199.

 

Class 5: Relevant Organs and Societal Forces on China’s Foreign Policy (Oct. 14th, 2011)

 

Required Reading

 

Yufan Hao and Lin Su, (eds.), China’s Foreign Policy Making: Societal Forces and China’s American Policy (Hampshire England: Ashgate Publishing Limited, 2005)

 

Bonnie S. Glaser and Phillip C. Saunders, “Chinese Civilian Foreign Policy

Research Institutes: Evolving Roles and Increasing Influence,” in China Quarterly, No. 171 (September 2002), pp. 597-616

 

Selected Reading

 

Wang Yiwei, “Public Diplomacy and the Rise of Chinese Soft Power”, The Annals of American Academy of Political and Social Science, No. 1, 2008. SSCI)

 

PART III: Bilateral and Multilateral Relations

 

Class 6: Relationship between China and Great Powers (Oct. 21st , 2013)

 

Required Reading

 

Steven M. Goldstein, “Nationalism and Internationalism: Sino-Soviet Relations,” in Thomas W. Robinson and David Shambaugh, ed., Chinese Foreign Policy:

Theory and Practice, (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1997), Ch.9, pp.224-265.

 

Wang Jisi, “China’s Search for Stability With America”, Foreign Affairs, Sep/Oct 2005, Vol. 84, Issue 5, pp. 39-48, 8p.

 

 

David M. Lampton, “China‟s Rise in Asia May Not Be at America‟s Expense,” in Shambaugh, ed., Power Shift: China and Asia’s New Dynamics (Berkeley, Calif: University of California Press, 2005), Ch 10, Ch.14, pp.306-326

 

Robert B. Zeollick, (U.S. Deputy Secretary of State), “Whither China: From Membership to Responsibility?” Remarks to National Committee on U.S.-China

Relations,    New     York     City,     September   21,        2005. http://www.state.gov/s/d/rem/53682.htm

 

Selected Reading

 

Zha Daojiong,”Energy in Sino-American relations:putting mutual anxiety in context”, Strategic Analysis, 31(3), May 2007 : 491-506.

 

Yu Bin, “China and Russia: Normalizing Their Strategic Partnership,” in David Shambaugh, ed., Power Shift: China and Asia’s New Dynamics (Berkeley: University of California Press, 2005), Ch 10, pp.228-244.

 

Wang Jisi & Nye Jr., Joseph S., “Hard Decisions on Soft Power”, Harvard International Review, Summer 2009, Vol. 31, Issue 2, pp. 18-22, 5p.

 

Tao Wenzhao, Huang Ping, Wang Rongjun , Yuan Zheng and Zhao Xingshu, “China-US Relations, Tending Towards Maturity”, The International Spectator: Italian Journal of International Affairs, Volume 44, Issue 2, 2009, pp. 9–16.

 

Midterm: Submit article review paper (Oct. 30th, 2013)

 

Class 7: Presentation & Discussion (Oct. 28th, 2011)

Group I——Chinese political culture and China’s peaceful rise

Group II——The interaction between the Rising China and the World

 

Class 8: China’s Relations with its Neighboring Countries (Nov. 4th, 2013)

 

Required Reading

 

Akira Chiba and Lanxin Xiang, “Traumatic Legacies in China and Japan: An Exchange,” Survival, Vol. 47, No.2 (Summer 2005), pp. 215-232

 

Peter Hays Gries, “China‟s „New Thinking‟ on Japan,” The China Quarterly, (forthcoming 2005), pp. 831-850

 

Fan Yongming,”Searching for Common Interests between China and Japan: a Chinese view”; Journal of Contemporary China, May 2008, Vol. 17 Issue 55, p375-382, 8p

 

Yang Bojiang, “Redefining Sino-Japanese Relations after Koizumi”, The Washington Quarterly, Volume 29, Number 4, Autumn 2006, pp. 129-137. 

 

David Shambaugh, “The Rise of China and Asia‟s New Dynamics,” in

Shambaugh, ed., Power Shift: China and Asia’s New Dynamics (Berkeley,

California: University of California Press, 2005), Introduction, pp.1-20

 

Tang Shiping, “Introduction,” in Shiping Tang, Mingjiang Li, and Amitav Acharya, eds., Living with China: China and Regional States through Crises and Turning Points (New York: Palgrave-Macmillan 2009), pp. 1-18.

 

Selected Reading

 

David Kang, “Hierarchy and Stability in Asian International System,” in G. John Ikenberry and Michael Mastanduno, eds., International Relations Theory and the Asia-Pacific (New York: Columbia University Press, 2003), pp. 163-189

 

Shen Dingli, “Cooperative Denuclearization toward North Korea”, The Washington Quarterly, Volume 32, Issue 4, 01 October 2009, pp. 175–188.

 

Ren Xiao, “Between adapting and shaping: China’s role in Asian regional cooperation”, Journal of Contemporary China, 59, March 2009 : 303-320. Zhang Guihong, “The Rise of China: India’s Perceptions and Responses”, South Asian Survey, Mar 2006; vol. 13: pp. 93 – 102.

 

Zhang Guihong, “Sino-Indian Security Relations: Bilateral Issues, External Factors and Regional Implications”, South Asian Survey, Mar 2005; vol. 12: pp. 61 – 74.

 

Sun Xuefeng ,“Why Does China Reassure South-East Asia?”, Pacific Focus, Volume 24, Issue 3, December 2009, pp, 298-316.

 

Class 9: China’s Relations with Developing Countries (Nov. 11th, 2013)

 

Required Reading

 

Philip Snow, “China and Africa: Consensus and Camouflage”, in Thomas W. Robinson and David Shambaugh, ed., Chinese Foreign Policy: Theory and Practice, (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1997) Ch.11, pp.282-321.

 

Lillian Craig Harris, “Myth and Reality in China‟s Relations with the Middle East”, in Thomas W. Robinson and David Shambaugh, ed., Chinese Foreign Policy: Theory and Practice, (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1997) Ch.12, pp.322-347.

 

Xiao Jialing, China-Africa Relations: Progress, Challenge and Prospect, Fudan

Journal of the Humanities and Social Science (Quarterly) Vol. 3, No. 1, March 2010, pp.55-90

 

Selected Reading

 

Li Anshan, “China and Africa: policy and challenges”, China Security, 3(3), Summer 2007 : 69-94.

 

Class 10: China-EU Relations and China’s Relations with International Regimes

(Nov. 18th, 2013)

 

Required Reading

 

Michael B. Yahuda, “China and Europe: The significance of a Secondary Relationship,” in Thomas W. Robinson and David Shambaugh, ed., Chinese Foreign Policy: Theory and Practice, (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1997), Ch.10, pp.266-282.

 

Xiao Jialing, China and the World:How to live harmoniously? Fudan Journal of the Humanities and Social Science (Quarterly) Vol. 2, No. 2, June 2009, pp.1-29

 

Chen Zhimin & Jönsson Christer, “Toward Post-Sovereign Diplomacy? Learning from Chinese and European History”, Conference Papers — International Studies Association; 2008 Annual Meeting, pp. 1-16, 16p.

 

Li Shaojun,”Key Elements of China‟s Foreign Strategy”, in The International Politics of EU-China Relations, edited by David Kerr & Liu Fei, Published for The British Academy by Oxford University Press, 2007.

 

Elizabeth Economy, “The Impact of International Regimes on Chinese Foreign Policy-Making: Broadening Perspectives and Policies——But Only to a Point,” in David M. Lampton, ed., The Making of Chinese Foreign and Security Policy in the Era of Reform, 1978-2000, (Stanford, California: Stanford University Press, 2001), Ch. 8, pp. 230-256

 

Selected Reading

 

Shen Dingli, “Why China sees the EU as a counterweight to America”, Europe’s World,Autumn 2008.

 

Hongying Wang, “Multilateralism in Chinese Foreign Policy: the Limits of Socialization,” Asian Survey, Vol. 40, No. 3 (May/June, 2000), pp. 475-491

 

Shen Dingli, “China’s Nuclear Perspective: Deterrence Reduction, Nuclear Non-Proliferation, and Disarmament”, Strategic Analysis, Volume 32, Issue 4, 2008, pp. 637–653. 

 

Wu Chengqiu, “Sovereignty, Human Rights, and Responsibility: Changes in

China‟s Response to International Humanitarian Crises”, Journal of Chinese Political Science, Volume 15, Number 1 / March 2010, pp. 71–97.

 

 

Class 11: Presentation & Discussion (Nov. 25th , 2013)

Group III——China’s role in Asia Pacific prosperity and security 

Group IV——The Changing Relationship between China and the other Great

Powers

 

PART IV. Conclusion

 

Class 12: Conclusion lecture, Q &A (Dec. 2nd, 2013)

Class 13: Final Exam (Dec. 9th, 2013)

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